"Feral ~ from feminine of ferus wild: having escaped from domestication and become wild"...




Friday

looking for love in all the wrong places...or inotherwords "the process of buying the new forever horse"


This process of finding another family member gelding has not been easy. 

Im gonna whine now,
so please go get your balloons 
to bring to my pity party.

i like paper pointy hats too.


So far this is has been the process - 
we see an ad, we call, 
ask the list of questions we have, 
such as are they shod or barefoot, what kind of fencing are they used to, 
how often have they trailered, are they pastured or drylotted, 
are they vaccinated, have papers in order etc. 
and from there 
we make the decision to go see them.

But sometimes we dont even call, or go through the whole list of questions 

because...

here are my top 3 irritable whinny complaints for right now.

(please start blowing up the balloons now.)




#1. WY, MT Sellers (our area) NEED TO HAVE BRAND INSPECTION PAPERS IN ORDER TO SELL ANYONE A HORSE. They need to prove to the state that they live in that they actually own the horse. If they do not sell their horse with these, there are penalties - worse, they could be accused of being a horse rustler. not good. If the sale still goes through without these papers, they can and will still be liable later. And its not up to the buyer to convince the seller of this. its kinda the law.

Montana~  http://liv.mt.gov/be/hlthrqmn.mcpx

Wyoming~   http://wlsb.state.wy.us/Brands/UNDERSTANDING%20YOUR%20%20WYOMING%20BRAND%20INSPECTION%20PROGRAM.pdf



#2.  No vaccinations? WHY??? Do these people hate their family that much to risk rabies?  Or their poor horse; to risk west nile, strangles etc.? Please keep animals up to date (UTD) on vaccines for the area, Horse sellers - we wont even consider an animal that isnt vaccinated - we value our lives way too much. We will only buy an unvaccinated horse if we plan on eating him - and nope nope nope thats not gonna happen.  Also, if someone doesnt have their animals UTD, then we know for certain they arent on top of their other health needs either, like worming, feet, pasture/body checks etc. Last time I checked this is the year 2013, and we can now control certain diseases - we do not want those diseases anywhere near our other livestock or us, thank you...



#3. For petes sake, we do not need to see photos of someone standing on their horse. We are not impressed. If they are that silly to stand on their horse, then goodness knows what other crappy things (saddle/reins on fire? juggling 6 kittens? kissing rattlesnakes?) they have done on the back of that poor horse risking injury for themselves and their poor horse. These stupid photos do not prove how calm their horse is; it only proves that they are too cheap to buy a ladder. And that either have genetic issues or they self medicate way too much...



Im sure there are other issues that are bothering the heck out of me, 
but right now these are the top three...
and no. 
we havent found the one yet. 

but i guess if this is my biggest complaint of the summer,
we're doing pretty good.




So, what is your top irritable whiny complaints that you can think of when buying a horse?
or anything that requires an ad to respond to?

and is there any information 
anyone can share on how to make this process not so....
whiny?
(or is that whinny? ;)


Thank you ahead of time for your reply,
blogger friends!

`

ps - large font for Inger, the swedish goddess!



btw all these pictures were taken in South dakota where we did not see a horse to buy.

-

(you can deflate the balloons now, but im gonna keep the pointy paper hat on...)


~


26 comments:

  1. Oh Inger the Swedish Goddess will be pleased she truly is beautiful and can not help her beautiful sky blue beautiful eyes do not enjoy small print anymore.
    Oh where was I? Sorry thinking of Inger makes me happy.
    Oh yes balloons and pointy hats I know nothing about horse buying but I do have lots of ladders for any of those crazy horse standing on people YIKES. I also know shots are a very important thing for horses.
    I Love your photos my oh my they are beautiful my Ansel Adams wizard, he would be impressed.
    I do hope you have better luck finding a horse I cannot wait to see him or her standing beside Ebony as they walk towards the setting sun with smiles on their faces, can you imagine the photos you could get of that. I can also see your smile to my friend.
    Too much maybe but ice cream would solve that whiny thing:) or then again maybe not:)
    Good luck my friend it will happen. Hugs xo B

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  2. Well,here is a real horse pity party story...worthy of balloons and party hats. I wanted a horse so bad when I was "little". Since I lived in town, it couldn't happen. So MY horse was my bicycle. It didn't need any shots or to be dewormed. I threw ropes around the handle bars and tied it up so it wouldn't run off when I dismounted. I loved that old horse.

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  3. the last couple of horses i've gotten were adoptions (free) of retired brood mares that just needed good homes. i was lucky withh them.

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  4. Are there any rescues in your area -- seems with the economy the way it is, many around here are unable to keep their horses. Just a thought.

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  5. 1. People who leave ads up after the horse is sold.
    2. People who exaggerate how tall their horse is. "He's 18.2hh!" Not unless the woman in the photo is 8 feet tall!
    3. Horses for sale that are advertised as trained, but haven't actually been sat on in the last three years.

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  6. "Whiny" and "whiney" are how people get, "whinny" is what a horse does.

    Yeah, I was going to say people who leave ads up after the horse is sold. You wonder if it really was sold. Maybe it is still for sale, but they didn't want to sell it to you based on something you said? Makes you crazy wondering.

    I also hate con artists who misrepresent the horse, claiming it is perfect for any rider, and then when you show up with a beginning rider, the seller freaks out and says the horse needs an advanced rider.

    Then there are the ones who completely forget to mention that the horse is lame, or insist that the horse is fine while you are watching it limp or stumble around.

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  7. Your trip to S. Dak. was not wasted. Those photos are full of things that I really like. As in--bugs on the window, tilted drive-bys shots and horses up to their noses in grass--all done in a very classic b&w to make them timeless. Love it!

    And my balloon popped. You see I was running with it and I fell down...anyway it was red. Maybe someone will bring you Useful Pot to put things in and you can keep it there.

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  8. Can we all get some pointy party hats? It makes a great mental image... along with the deflated balloons waiting for the next pity party.
    You raise three excellent points. I haven't seriously looked at acquiring a new equine, but when I do peruse the ads I hate the excuses people put in for selling their perfectly perfect pony; must sell as I have broken both ankles, my house burned down and I have to move into town. Sure, there are some true stories out there, but I don't always trust the others. Then, I feel badly for the horses sold because they can be used for 'light work' only. IE they are in pain. And my last red flag is the 'bomb proof' phrase... usually preceded by 'absolutely'. OK, so there are some truly remarkable, trusting beasts out there that will go by anything without batting an eye... but I question the others.

    Nice post. Good luck. Whining is good for the soul!

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    1. Next time lets have ICE CREAM!!!

      (i havent taken off my imaginary pointy party hat yet)

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  9. Well #1) I don't have any complaints cuz I'm not plannin on buyin a horse (wish I could) and
    #2)I'm not near as knowledgeable as you about buying horse so I can't give you any advice.

    I do however wish you lots of luck finding the perfect one. I always think when the right one comes along you will know it.

    Felicia

    Ps have a great weekend

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  10. Oh, I guess the companion goat idea is out? Cuz I have the perfect 18.2hh goat for Baby... :)

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  11. It's been a long time, but I remember how difficult it was to find a good show horse for my son. Good luck!

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  12. I don't know anything about buying a horse, so I have no advice. Only kind words....don't give up if you really want it.

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  13. 1. Do they still hang horse thieves in your neck of the woods? (Hmmmm; looking back at that sentence, I see a dubious pun.)

    2. All my shots are up to date, so you don't have to worry about contracting diseases from this Bear. (You may have to worry about getting other things — like dubious puns.)

    3. Horses are fine upstanding creatures, without people standing up on their backs.

    Question: Janice: do old, run-down places tell us anything about the kind of horse(s) you seek?

    Yes, it is past my bed time; good night and good morning.

    Blessings and Bear hugs!
    desert.epiphanies@sasktel.net
    Bears Noting
    Life in the Urban Forest (poetry)

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    Replies
    1. Old run down places represent the feelings in my heart on this process LOL

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  14. Ya the brand inspection thing seems to be a hang up in those parts. Even thought it has been that way forever, so many people just ignore it. 2 of my horses changed hands without those papers. The first one was my mare. I didn't know about it until after I got her, but as soon as I did I got the brand inspection done. The inspector was very cool and and accepted the fact that I had a bill of sale and her papers. The second one was my paint, and he changed hands like 3 times without the inspection, but when I bought him I wasn't going to accept that, so I called the brand inspector and he came as we were doing the sale and took care of it for me. I was quite fortunate with that particular inspector, he was good friends with my boss, and did inspections on everyone of my horses, so by time we did the pain, he knew that I was always straight with him and always trying to be as legal as possible.

    Are you specifically looking for a horse for an inexperienced rider? I have a friend who has (or had last time I checked) a very nice little mare who has been started properly and has some good training under her, but is still classified as "green broke" because she isn't finished in any direction. I think she is asking 2500 for her.

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  15. So, just a question, what if you bring horses into either of those states without a brand inspection? They aren't required here and two of mine are not papered (grade pony, grade gelding). I only have bills of sale and Coggins. Do you have to get your horse branded to move to WY or MT?

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    1. Hi Jenn! No, you do not need to get your horses branded if you move to WY or MT - they do write up Brand inspection papers for horses without brands (in my case - black horse, whorl on forehead etc. lol) and they do not require you to ever brand them.

      But you will need to get a certificate of veterinary inspection in the state you are moving them from, to have on hand when you actually move them.

      When you do move a new horse from a non brand inspection state into Montana (we moved from WI to MT), you are required to have whats called a "certificate of veterinary inspection" (CVI) that is filled out and registered by an accreditted vet in the state that you are moving FROM, within 30 days BEFORE you move http://www.liv.mt.gov/ah/import/popup.mcpx . This is required with any horse you bring in from another state to MT, whether you are moving, or you have purchased a horse from out of state.

      You need brand inspection papers in MT when a) you, the MT Resident owner, are selling the horse who resides in the state of MT b) or you are moving the horse across county lines as the resident MT owner (like going trail riding in the mountains, or showing or breeding etc.) c) or you, the resident owner, are removing the horse from the state or d) you, the resident owner are putting your horse in an auction, (which seems to be the preferred method out here for buying a horse due to the requirement of having all papers in order.)

      The only way to avoid having to do a brand inspection here is if you move initially from a non-branding inspection state to a branding inspection state with your CVI, and then that horse NEVER leaves your property during its lifespan.

      Concerning our issue of horse buying, from what I was told by a brand inspector (who happens to be a good neighbor lol), you need to have brand inspection papers if you are a horse SELLER in the state of MT or WY - to prove you own the horse. Many people in these two states buy (or are given) horses with brands from area ranches - these papers are the State's way to prove that the seller has the right to sell the horse i.e. did not steal the horse from the branding ranch or its a loose horse that wandered in. Some people complain, but if your horse is stolen or is loose or gets mixed up with someone elses herd, it actually it makes it easier for you to recover/claim your horse legally with these papers before someone sells them off. At the border of the states, they actually have and will pull over trailers to check papers. If you do not have a current CVI (remember, 30 day window only!), or brand inspection papers, they can confiscate your horse and trailer on the spot. They take this very seriously.

      BTW Lifetime brand inspection that is good for the life of the horse is only $25. in the state of Montana. Cheaper then 3 tubes of Equimax wormer when its on sale ... ;) I also like the fact that in MT and WY, they take the life of a horse very seriously - these are animals who are considered valuable in these states, no matter what the condition or age they are in, and thats very good in my eyes :) .


      (BTW, my major was Animal science, and I did a stint of a year of Equine Science way back when I was a young pup - so i have a tendency to be more on the up and up with these kind of things because well, im a horseman, and well, before Forestry, I worked for a local city police dept., and now have friends who would chide me if i got lazy and dont do right lol )

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  16. Good luck with the search. It isn't easy. We looked at a couple million ads online when we were looking for Winston and then Mufasa. I had a list of what I was looking for temperment and training wise, and didn't compromise. There are an awful lot of inaccurate ads out there-- and that is VERY annoying.

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  17. Bad combo....
    Being fed up to here with menopause and
    Being fed up to here with stupid people!

    Just sayin'
    I know...I got my party hat on!

    Cindy Bee

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  18. Great photos! So full of emotion! Have faith - you will find your perfect horse. He is just waiting for you. The stars will all line up. It is meant to be. xo

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  19. Hey, first time reading your blog and I just had a thought - Under my vets suggestion (I asked him which shots my horses needed), because my horses do not come into contact w/ other horses nor do they leave my property, we only vaccinate for tetanus. However, I do fecals 2x per year to develop a deworming program, their feet are done every 6-8wks depending on how their feet are holding up, and have their teeth done annually... so would that exclude a horse from your list? I'm just curious!

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    1. Good question!

      To be honest, I would probably not buy a horse from you - because I cannot make an educated decision if your horses have ever been exposed to EIA (which is transmitted by flies, hence having a coggins test to test for it), or rabies, which has a long dormant period before it shows, and that disease will not only kill my other horse but me also. If I do buy a horse from you and remove it from your property, i will be also exposing that horse to all sorts of things that could make it very sick - thats why i need to vaccinate fully any horse i own. Plus I like following the law :) - Coggins, and a vet certificate are required to move a horse across state and county lines - In WY & MT, by law the seller is required to have brand inspection papers for the buyer in order to sell the horse.

      Basically, in order to purchase a horse from your current standing, I would have a vet (who has to do the vet certificate anyway as required by law in Montana) give vaccinations while at your place - BUT then we have to have the horse quarantined from ALL other horses (your place or at the vets) for two weeks, until we get coggins test results and/or any vaccination reaction, which means added time, traveling time and costs - but it still wouldnt rule out rabies. I just dont want to take that risk. A Coggins negative test certificate is required by law to move any horse. Also, if you live in a brand inspection state, you as the seller have to have a brand inspector come and see the horse and draw up papers, otherwise legally you cannot sell the horse without a fine coming your way. The ranchers and breeders I know take these brand inspection laws seriously.

      Its so much easier when the seller has the usual UTD's, the coggins test, and brand inspection all together so that you can try out the horse, have the vet out to inspect and you are good to go without having the quarantine time. But then this is why livestock horse auctions are so popular around here - by law they need to have all the papers on hand to list the horse. The only problem with auctions is that certain people will drug up the horse - whether to calm them, or keep them out of pain - so i prefer to buy from someone who has the horse on their place and where i can have a prepurchase exam done. If Vaccinations, coggins testing, quarantine boarding time has to be factored in, then I certainly wouldnt pay the sellers what they are asking for - i would ask for them to shoulder at least 1/2 of the costs, honestly. Its so much easier, if you as a seller know you are going to sell the horse that year, to have the shots done at your yearly exam and the coggins drawn then - how much more valuable your horse would be to a potential buyer with you having those papers in hand.

      So thats it in a nutshell; i guess one of the reasons why i like all these laws concerning horses, is that it gives them value no matter what age or condition they are in - that they are not throwaway animals.

      Thanks for reading, and the question!

      :)

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  20. You are so CUTE -- if one can be both FERAL and CUTE then that's what you are. I missed this post at the time you wrote it because I was recuperating, but after I read your comment today I had to come by to let you know this: While I'm not sure about that matriarch stuff, it sounds like someone with a lot of kids and since I've never had even one, I don't feel qualified. But I will be your friend, always. And it really touched my heart that I may somehow be a golden age inspiration to someone. Wow, that's something. I mean, I don't really do anything. Much. But I am happy with the small things in life and with nature. We share that, I know.

    I love all the photos here.

    AND I IMMEDIATELY NOTICED THE LARGER FONT AND IT REALLY MADE A DIFFERENCE. BUT IF YOU DON'T LIKE IT, PLEASE GO BACK TO THE OLD WAY. I CAN READ THAT TOO. MAY EVEN BE GOOD EYE EXERCISE. THANKS AGAIN, MY FRIEND FOR YOUR COMMENT.

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  21. I'm way behind and trying to catch up. What about a riding mule like 7MSN?

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  22. Hi, I ve so enjoyed your last two blogs. Its a pleasure always to come by. I too am so far behind.

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I am feral, so although I dont respond at all like most domesticated bloggers, I will try my best - Thank you for even wanting to leave a comment, as it may draw me out from the woods from whence I came!

Or under a rock, it depends most days...